Robot Books for Kids

The Invention Of Hugo Cabret

4 stars
Invention Of Hugo Cabret
ASIN: 0439813786

Scholastic Press


Author: Brian Selznick

When twelve-year-old Hugo, an orphan living and repairing clocks within the walls of a Paris train station in 1931, meets a mysterious toyseller and his goddaughter, his undercover life and his biggest secret are jeopardized.
The author is Brian Selznick and the publisher is Scholastic Press. The was released sometime in 2007. This is the 1st ed. of the child's book is 533 pages long and it is loaded with black and white artwork. The children's book is 8.46"H x 5.31"L x 1.81"W and has a weight of 2.63 lbs. Whilst reading can be something in which everybody of just about any age can engage in, there are surely many different ways which you could make the thrill more pleasant. Some folks proclaim they don't really have time to read, yet reading can also be a wonderful use of time, particularly with the proper child's book. For additional details on this children's book, check out our store add to cart button below.

Orphan, clock keeper, and thief, Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival is determined by secrets and anonymity. But when his world suddenly interlocks with an eccentric, bookish girl and a bitter old man who runs a toy booth in the station, Hugo's undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, and a hidden message from Hugo's dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

Book Description:Orphan, clock keeper, and thief, Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. But when his planet suddenly interlocks with an eccentric, bookish girl and a bitter old man who runs a toy booth in the station, Hugo's undercover life, and his most precious secret, are put in jeopardy. A cryptic drawing, a treasured notebook, a stolen key, a mechanical man, as appropriately as a hidden message from Hugo's dead father form the backbone of this intricate, tender, and spellbinding mystery.

When I was a kid, two of my favorite books were by an amazing man named Remy Charlip. Every single turn reveals something new in a way that builds on the image on the previous page. Now that I'm an illustrator myself, I've often believed about this dramatic storytelling device and all of its creative possibilities. Fortunately and Thirteen fascinated me in part because, in both books, the extremely act of turning the pages plays a pivotal role in telling the story.

My new book, The Invention of Hugo Cabret, may be a 550 page novel in words and pictures. But as opposed to most novels, the images in my new book don't just illustrate the story; they help tell it. I've used the lessons I learned from Remy Charlip and other masters of the picture book to generate one distinct thing that is not a exactly a novel, not quite a picture book, not actually a graphic novel, or a flip book or perhaps a movie, but a mixture of all these things.

I started thinking about this book ten years ago following seeing a number of the magical films of Georges Mé liè s, the father of science-fiction movies. At that moment, Hugo Cabret was born. I discovered that Mé liè s had a collection of mechanical, wind-up figures (called automata) that had been donated to a museum, but which were later destroyed and thrown away. Instantly, I imagined a boy discovering these broken, rusty machines in the garbage, stealing one and attempting to fix it. But it wasn't till I read a book called Edison's Eve: The Quest for Mechanical Life by Gaby Woods that my story started to come into concentrate.

A handful of years ago, I had the honor of meeting Remy Charlip, and I'm proud to say that we've turn out to be friends. So each time you see Mé liè s in The Invention of Hugo Cabret, the individual you are really looking at is my dear friend Remy Charlip, who continues to inspire everyone who has the great pleasure of knowing him or seeing his operate. Last December he was asking me what I was working on, and as I was describing this book to him, I realized that Remy looks exactly like Georges Mé liè s. I excitedly asked him to pose as the character in my book, and fortunately, he mentioned yes.

Brian Selznick on a"Deleted Scene"from The Invention of Hugo Cabret This genuinely is really a completed drawing that I had to cut from The Invention of Hugo Cabret. I'm glad to see it up on the Amazon website since otherwise no 1 would have ever seen all those tiny cameras I researched and drew so carefully! I researched original French camera posters and created sure that the counter too as the shelves were right for the time period. I tried really hard to locate ANOTHER moment when I could have Etienne inside a camera shop, but, as painful as it was, I knew the picture had to go. There was originally a scene in the story exactly where this character, Etienne, is working inside a camera shop. On one particular of my research trips to Paris I spent an entire day visiting old camera shops and photographing cameras from the 1930's and earlier, too as the facades inside the shops themselves. I did all the drawings inside the book at 1/4 scale, so they were truly tiny and I often had to function with a magnifying glass to assist me see what I was drawing. After I finished this drawing I continued to rewrite, and for numerous reasons I realized that I required to move this scene from the camera shop for the French Film Academy, which meant that I had to cut this picture. I was nonetheless rewriting the book when I had to begin the final art.



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